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JGSGB Publication Addenda

As everyone knows, any reference book once published is immediately out of date as information changes all the time.  This applies to general information and to specific data.  With the Internet, changes happen even more rapidly than ever before.  This applies a lot to website addresses and new websites.  Republishing our Jewish Ancestors? Guides every time a few websites change is not realistic, so we will be providing updated information for of our Guides on this page.  We will add not only new website links but some more general information.

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A Guide to Jewish Genealogy in Poland - Update 10 July 2014

"Discussions are taking place in Poland about instituting new legislation covering access to birth, marriage and death records. The major item of interest for genealogists is a clause under discussion that would still require that birth records be 100 years old before they could be released while marriage and death records could be made available after 80 years, rather than the 100 years currently in force.

Another significant change being discussed is a clause that would enable Civil Registration Offices (USCs) to take up to 10 years between the date that records become 100-years old and the time they are transferred to the relevant branch office of the Polish State Archives. The clause would allow Civil Records Offices up to 10 years to prepare records that are 80 to 100-years old for transfer to the Branch Archives.  (Where the condition of the record registers do not meet their standards, the Polish State Archives requires that the books be fumigated and/or repaired prior to being moved to the archives.) 

There is another clause under discussion covering death records that would require transfer to the Branch Archive within two years of when the latest records in the books become 80 years old.

Jewish Records Indexing-Poland has not taken a position on this pending legislation; any statements from other organizations do not reflect the viewpoint of JRI-Poland.

JRI-Poland's approach has always been one of careful analysis and consultation. We have been in touch with major parties interested in this legislation and will continue to do so.  When there is additional information, we will share it on this forum.

Stanley Diamond

Executive Director, Jewish Records Indexing - Poland"

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A Guide to Jewish Genealogy in Poland - Update 3 August 2014

 "The first cadastral map of Lemberg/Lwow/Lvov to be posted in the Gesher Galicia Cadastral Map Room:

 http://maps.geshergalicia.org/cadastral/lviv-lwow-lemberg-1853/

A complete cadastral map of the city of Lemberg surveyed 1849 and lithographed in 1853. A very clear and beautiful full-color cadastral map, showing this gem of the Austrian Empire already developed with many of the streets and significant buildings still visible today."

A Guide to Jewish Genealogy in Poland - Update 22 August 2014

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Gesher Galicia has added two new inventories of cadastral map holdings in the Rzeszow and Przemysl branches of the Polish State Archives

Przemysl: http://www.geshergalicia.org/ inventory/maps-przemysl-state- archives/

Rzeszow: http://www.geshergalicia.org/ inventory/maps-rzeszow-state- archives/

A Guide to Jewish Genealogy in Poland - Update 20 September 2014

Announcing three recent additions to the Gesher Galicia Cadastral Map Room:

Krakow Street Map Under Occupation ca. 1941

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/ special/krakow-occupation-nd/

This important map showing Krakow (Cracow, Krakau) under German occupation during WWII was provided to Gesher Galicia by the Jewish Historical Institute of Warsaw, Poland. Four zones are highlighted by hand, including the town center ('mixed/business district', A), initial German residential area (B), extended German residential area (C), and the ghetto ('Jewish residential', D). Streets are labeled with their Polish names, but some are Germanized. The Kazimierz district, two Jewish cemeteries and key churches are indicated, but not synagogues.

There are also two cadastral maps for two different towns named Rudawka: one in Poland, the other about 40 kilometers NNW, across the border in Ukraine.

Rudawka Village Cadastral Map 1852 (Gmina Bircza)

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/ cadastral/rudawka-1852/

This is a selectively-colored cadastral map of the village of Rudawka (now in the Gmina Bircza of Poland), surveyed 1852 and lithographed 1854. The map shows no village center or masonry buildings, but includes a modest estate and two small Catholic chapels.

Rudawka Village Cadastral Map 1853 (Stary Sambor Raion)

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/ cadastral/rudawka-rudavka- 1853/

A complete, selectively-colored cadastral map of the village of Rudawka (Rudavka,) now a defunct settlement in the Stary Sambor Raion of Ukraine, surveyed 1853 and lithographed 1854. Covering a large but sparsely populated village straddling the Rudawka River with two other rivers flowing in, the map shows no village center or masonry buildings, and only a tiny Catholic church.

(Note to researchers: there are several other formerly Galician towns with the name of, or beginning with, Rudawka. Knowing the coordinates of "your" towns are key when names are so similar.)

The map room home page is:  http://maps.geshergalicia.org

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All Galician Database

28 July 2014:
New databases added: :Drohobycz Jewish Birth Index (1921-1938)Kosów Jewish Marriage Records (1852-1876)Mielnica Jewish Death Records (1820-1851); and Sanok Jewish Marriage Index (Grooms Only) (1916-1939).

Major updates to existing databases:  Thousands of more records added to the existing vital records collections: Lviv Jewish Birth Records (1805-1871)Lviv Jewish Death Records (1805-1880)Lviv Jewish Marriage Records (1801-1866); and Sanok Jewish Birth Index (1869-1913) (the 1890-1913 births are new)

Want to know more about finding records in Poland please buy the guide.

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3 November 2014:

 American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee - http://search.archives.jdc.org

The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee announced that they will be posting online with free public access its Poland collection from 1945-1949. This collection was confiscated by the Communist Authorities. To access the collection go to: http://tinyurl.com/nhrj5vw

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Update 6 November 2014
Additional Information not covered in the Guide:
a
The Museum of History of Polish Jews (Polish: Muzeum Historii Żydów Polskich) is a museum on the site of the former Warsaw Ghetto. The cornerstone was laid in 2007, and the museum was first opened on April 19, 2013. The museum features a multimedia narrative exhibition about the vibrant Jewish community that flourished in Poland for a thousand years, which opened to the public in October 2014.

The Core Exhibition occupies more than 4,000 m2of space, and will present the thousand year history of Polish Jews – once the largest Jewish community in the world. History of Polish Jews will be presented in eight galleries:

Forest – the gallery tells the tale of how, fleeing from persecution in Western Europe, the Jews come to the land of current Poland. A place where they arrived and were told by the voice that came from the sky – Po-lin (en. Here rested). In this way, Poland for the next 1000 years would become the largest European home for the Jewish community.

First Encounters (the Middle Ages) – devoted to the first Jewish settlers in Poland. Visitors meet Ibrahim ibn Jakub, a Jewish diplomat from Cordoba, author of famous notes from a trip to Europe. One of the most interesting objects presented in the gallery will be the first sentence written in Yiddish in the Prayer Book of 1272.

Paradisus Iudaeorum (15th and 16th centuries) – this gallery presents how the Jewish community was organized, what role Jews played in the country’s economy. One of the most important elements in this gallery will be an interactive model of Kraków and Jewish Kazimierz, showing the rich culture of the local Jewish community. Visitors will be able to understand that religious tolerance in Poland made it a ‘Paradisus ludaeorum’ – ‘Jewish paradise’. This golden age of the Jewish community in Poland ended in pogroms that occurred during the Khmelnitsky Uprising. This event will be commemorated by a symbolic fire gall leading to the next gallery.

The Jewish Town (17th and 18th centuries) – this gallery presents the history of Polish Jews until the period of the partitions. It is shown by an example of a typical borderland town where Jews constituted a significant part of the population. The most important part of this gallery is a unique reconstruction of the roof and ceiling of Gwoździec, a wooden synagogue that was located in Ukraine.

Encounters with Modernity (19th century) – this part of the exhibition presents the time of the partitions when Jews shared the fate of Polish society divided between Austria, Prussia and Russia. The exhibition includes what role played Jewish entrepreneurs, such as Izrael Kalmanowicz Poznański, in the industrial revolution in Polish lands. This part also tells visitors about what changes underwent in traditional Jewish rituals and other areas of life, and the emergence of new social movements, religious and political. This period is also marked by the emergence of modern anti-semitism, which Polish Jews had to face.

On the Jewish Street – a gallery devoted to the period of the Second Polish Republic, which is seen – despite the challenges that the young country had to face – as a second golden age in the history of Polish Jews. A graphical timeline will be presented with the most important political events of the interwar period. The exhibition will also highlight Jewish film, theater and literature.

Holocaust – this gallery shows the horror of the Holocaust, which resulted in the deaths of approximately 90% of the 3.3 million Polish Jews. Visitors are shown the history of the Warsaw Ghetto, and are introduced to Emanuel Ringelblum and Oneg Shabbat. The gallery also presents various reactions of Poles to the extermination of Jews.

Postwar Years – the last gallery shows the period after 1945, when most of the survivors of the Holocaust emigrated, mostly because of the post-war takeover of Poland by the Soviets and the state sponsored anti-Semitic campaign in 1968 conducted by the communist authorities. An important date is the year 1989 (marking the end of Soviet domination), followed by the revival of a small but very dynamic Jewish community in Poland.
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A
Update 12 November 2014

P29

About two-thirds of the Krakow Census of 1880 is now viewable online for free, with (handwritten) name indices, thanks to Poland's National Archives in Krakow and National Digital Archives. It is not known whether the rest will be similarly available.

The general procedure is to first check the two name indices, which are roughly alphabetized by surname of the head of household:

http://szukajwarchiwach.pl/29/87/0/2/26/str/1/1/100#tabSkany

http://szukajwarchiwach.pl/29/87/0/2/27/str/1/1/100#tabSkany

When you find an index entry for a person of interest, record the two numbers next to it in the "Lizcba domu" and "Dziel. miasta" columns (e.g., 50 and VIII).

Then, visit

http://szukajwarchiwach.pl/29/87/0/str/1/100?ps=True#tabJednostki,

which has links to groups of census images, and find the link that includes "Dz." followed by your "Dziel. miasta" number (Roman numerals) and has a "nr" range including your "Lizcba domu" number (Arabic numerals). For example, if your numbers are 50 and VIII, the relevant link is "Spis ludnosci 1880, Dz. VIII, nr 25-67, T. 19."

After following that link, search for a census image that looks like a spreadsheet and has your "Liczba domu" number (e.g, 50) in the top right. There might be several with the same "Liczba domu" number, and one or more should have information about the person/family of interest.

Along the way, you will need to enlarge thumbnail images (by clicking on them), and possibly enlarge even further (by clicking on the icon that looks like a white rectangle on a black circle near the bottom right of the first enlargement). Fully enlarged, high-resolution images can be saved to your computer ("Download" link below the image)

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